Art notes: 4 finalists announced for Hudgens Prize; Mint exhibits folk artist Lucas

Orion Wertz's "Untitled Portrait" (2012).

Orion Wertz’s “Untitled Portrait” (2012).

Rylan Steele's "Oratory Interior, Ave Maria, FL" (2012)

Rylan Steele’s “Oratory Interior, Ave Maria, FL” (2012)

The Hudgens Center for the Arts has announced the four Georgia artists selected as finalists for the third $50,000 Hudgens Prize, one of the country’s largest art awards: Bethany Collins, Scott Ingram, Rylan Steele and Orion Wertz.

All four will display their work in the finalist’s exhibition, April 7 through June 27 at the Duluth arts center. Each also receives a $1,500 stipend.

The $50,000 Hudgens Prize will be awarded by the same panel of jurors who selected the finalists, based on studio visits and the works on view in the finalist’s exhibition. The prize winner will be announced at a June 13 award celebration.

Scott Ingram. CONTRIBUTED BY FREDRIK BRAUER

Scott Ingram. CONTRIBUTED BY FREDRIK BRAUER

Collins and Ingram are Atlanta multimedia artists. Steele teaches photography at Columbus State University. Columbus artist Wertz specializes in paintings and drawings. (Click here for full bios on each artist.)

The jury panel includes: Shannon Fitzgerald, executive director, Rochester Art Center, Rochester, Minn.; Buzz Spector, art professor, Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts, Washington University, St. Louis; and Hamza Walker, associate curator, the Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago.

Bethany Collins. CONTRIBUTED BY JOEFF DAVIS

Bethany Collins. CONTRIBUTED BY JOEFF DAVIS

Previous Hudgens Prize winners were Atlanta artists Gyun Hur (2010) and Pam Longobardi (2013).

 

 

VISUAL ART
Mint brings fresh focus to Lucas’ folk art

In a bit of a departure, the alternative art space Mint is exhibiting folk art master Charlie Lucas in the solo exhibit “In Transition,” opening with a 6-9 p.m. Feb. 20 artist reception.

Charlie Lucas.

Charlie Lucas.

Known as the “Tin Man,” Lucas is a self-taught artist based in Selma, Ala., known for inventive found-object sculptures and personal-narrative paintings.

“In Transition” will feature a curated selection of Lucas’ works alongside scavenged materials from his studio, serving as a document of his studio practice and artistic process.

Creative director Candice Greathouse said the gallery is excited to expose the 60-something artist, whose work is included in collections including the High Museum of Art’s, to a new audience.

“His work is not only integral to the history of the Southeast and the tradition of folk art, but his emphasis on material and process is also relevant to the broader history of contemporary art and art practices,” she said.

Lucas will give a gallery talk at 1 p.m. Feb. 21.

Through March 22. Noon-6 p.m. Wednesdays-Sundays. Free. 636 N. Highland Ave. N.E., Atlanta. 770-595-4248, www.mintatl.org.


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