Ideas for flicks to see as the Atlanta Film Festival gets into its groove

"In Our Son's Name," Atlanta filmmaker Gayla Jamison’s documentary about one family's story after a son is lost in the 9/11 terrorism, screens March 26.

“In Our Son’s Name,” Atlanta filmmaker Gayla Jamison’s documentary about one family’s story after a son is lost in the 9/11 terrorism, screens March 26.

The Atlanta Film Festival launched this weekend, and here are some upcoming films to consider as the 10-day, 150-title-plus indie film extravaganza continues through next weekend at the Plaza Theatre and other theaters. Note that it’s always good to check the fest’s site for ticket availability before heading out,

“Blood, Sweat and Beer,” a documentary chronicling two new craft breweries in Maryland and Pennsylvania (noon Sunday, followed by a Food on Film Party, with samples of local brews, at 1:30 p.m. at Callanwolde Fine Arts Center, $20 for both).

“The Firefly,” a Colombian film about the evolving relationship of two women after the sudden death of the man who was a brother/fiancee (7 p.m. Sunday at Woodruff Arts Center’s Hill Auditorium).

“Imba Means Sing,” Danielle Bernstein’s documentary (produced by former CNN writer-producer Erin Bernhardt) following African Children’s Choir singers from Uganda on a transformative world tour. The Atlanta Music Project Choir and Yacht Rock Revue perform before the screening (7:30 p.m. March 24, Rialto Center for the Arts).

“While We’re Young,” Noah Baumbach’s marriage comedy starring Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts (7 p.m. March 25).

Frank Morgan, playing circa 1992, in the documentary " Sound of Redemption: The Frank Morgan Story, coming in March to the Atlanta Film Festival. CONTRIBUTED BY JAMES GUDEMAN

Frank Morgan, playing circa 1992, in the documentary ” Sound of Redemption: The Frank Morgan Story, screening March 25 at the Atlanta Film Festival. CONTRIBUTED BY JAMES GUDEMAN

“Sound of Redemption: The Frank Morgan Story,” a documentary from N.C. Heikin about the troubled life and redemption of the late Los Angeles jazz star. Acclaimed as an heir to mentor Charlie Parker, saxophone ace Morgan had his career and life derail when heroin addiction led him into a life of crime. Then, after three decades of prison stints, he mounted a remarkable comeback  (7:30 p.m. March 25, Rialto Center for the Arts).

“In Our Son’s Name,” Atlanta filmmaker Gayla Jamison’s documentary about the peaceable, post-9/11 path follow ed by Phyllis and Orlando Rodriguez after they lost their son, Greg, in the terrorism (7:15 p.m. March 26).

“Satanic Panic 2: Battle of the Bands.” It turns out the electronic dance band behind tunes such as “6-6-Sexy” in Atlanta filmmaker Eddie Ray’s film aren’t Satan worshippers after all; they fight like the devil for the common good (6:30 p.m. March 27, 7 Stages).

“The Sisterhood of Night,” a contemporary take on the Salem witch trials, based on the short story by Pulitzer Prize-winner Steven Millhauser about New York high school girls who form a secret society and are accused of sexual deviancy (7 p.m. March 27).

“Breathe” (“Respire”), a French drama from director-actress Melanie Laurent that charts an obsessive, and ultimately destructive, friendship between two teenage girls (9:30 p.m. March 27).

“Montedoro,” a mystery in which a middle-aged American woman journeys to a remote southern Italy town hoping to discover her ancestry and, finding it abandoned, ends up on a magical voyage to self-knowledge (2:30 p.m. March 28).

“Sunshine Superman,” a documentary about Carl Boenish, considered the father of BASE jumping (parachuting from a skyscraper or a cliff), with director Marah Strauch appearing at the screening (7 p.m. March 28).

“Love & Mercy,” the Brian Wilson bio-pic with both John Cusack and Paul Dano playing the Beach Boy (12:15 p.m. March 29).

“Apartment Troubles,” a female buddy comedy in which writers-co-directors Jennifer Prediger and Jess Weixler also star as codependent struggling conceptual artists (2:15 p.m. March 29).

“Holbrook/Twain: An American Odyssey,” following now-90-year-old actor Hal Holbrook, who has performed a one-man Mark Twain show for six decades. Director Scott Teems and editor Anthony Innarelli are from Lilburn and studied film at Georgia State University (4 p.m. March 29).

“Game of Thrones,” a free preview of the season five debut episode of the HBO hit (7:30 p.m. March 29 at the Fox Theatre; limited tickets remain for walk-ups, with doors opening at 6 p.m.).

NOW SHOWING
Atlanta Film Festival

Through March 29 at the Plaza Theatre (1049 Ponce de Leon Ave. N.E., Atlanta) and other sites. Tickets, $10 most screenings. www.atlantafilmfestival.com.


View Comments 0