Atlantan’s sculpture makes statement at Dallas horse park; 2 metro artists in collage exhibit at N.C.’s Bascom

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Atlanta sculptor Curtis Patterson's sculpture “Equine Rhythm” will greet visitors to the Texas Horse Park in Dallas.
Atlanta sculptor Curtis Patterson's sculpture “Equine Rhythm” will greet visitors to the Texas Horse Park in Dallas.

Atlanta sculptor Curtis Patterson’s sculpture “Equine Rhythm” will greet visitors to the Texas Horse Park in Dallas.

Atlanta sculptor Curtis Patterson is expected to be in attendance as his large-scale sculpture “Equine Rhythm” is dedicated at the entrance to the Texas Horse Park in Dallas during opening ceremonies on Saturday.

Made of Corten steel, which develops a dark red patina that radiates a deep reddish-orange glow in the sunlight, “Equine Rhythm” is 19 feet high, 10.5 feet wide and 15 feet long.

“Horses typically have a minimum of four distinct movements: the walk, trot, canter and the gallop. All of these movements are determined by the foot fall of the horse,” Patterson said in the dedication announcement. “With this sculpture, I have attempted to symbolically capture some of those movements through the use of surface texture, and the assignment of various elements in a rhythmic and balladry pattern within the sculpture composition.”

David Fisher, interim director of the Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs, which managed the commission funded by the city’s Park and Recreation Department, said the sculpture “creates a noble presence” as it greets horse park guests.

Patterson’s public art installations include the Andrew Young tribute plaza centered around a 25-foot-tall bronze obelisk in downtown Atlanta and “Celebration for a Champion,” honoring athlete Jesse Owens and sited near the entrance to Jesse Owens Plaza at Ohio State University.

Radcliffe Bailey's "En Route" (2005)

Radcliffe Bailey’s “En Route” (2005)

Atlanta connections in collage exhibit at N.C.’s Bascom

There is a strong Atlanta connection in the new exhibition “Appropriation Art: Finding Meaning in Found-Image Collage,” on view through May 31 at the Bascom: A Center for the Visual Arts in Highlands, N.C., just over the state line from the northeast Georgia town of Dillard.

The show includes a major work by Atlantan Radcliffe Bailey, the 68-inch-square mixed-media piece, “En Route,” on loan from the High Museum of Art, as well as pieces by Flora Rosefsky, who works out of Decatur’s Sycamore Place Gallery and Studios. “Appropriation Art,” which also includes works by Aaron Hequembourg of Monticello, was organized by former Atlantan Margaret Browne, who recently was appointed Bascom exhibitions curator after operating Chivaree Southern Art & Design in Cashiers, N.C., for three years.

Exhibit reception and panel discussion: 5-7 p.m. April 18. 323 Franklin Road, Highlands, N.C. 828-526-4949, www.thebascom.org.


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